INFORMATION FOR ALL ORNAMENTAL MODELS

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BLENCATHRA

 with Sharp Edge, Foule Crag & Narrow Edge


Blencathra at 2847 ft/868 mtrs, also known as Saddleback and is a ' Mountaineers Mountain' , is made up of mainly Metamorphic rocks that are now slates, were originally made from muds & some Sedimentary sandstones from sands that are 500 million years old and are oldest in the Lakes. They were laid down on an ocean floor but also shallow seas over millions of years. Over tens of millions of years the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, were uplifted then Volcanoes above sea level erupted lavas and ash completely burying these sedimentary rocks. Magma then cooled deep under surface forming Granite which part baked the Slates known as contact metamorphism. This Skiddaw Granite can be found to North West of Blencathra down at 1500 ft by Sinen Gill and to North by Caldew beck. Over the next hundreds of millions of years all these rocks were folded, compressed into Metamorphic rocks excepting the Granite, then uplifted, eroded, then sea levels reburied them, then more uplift and erosion. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. Now the becks and especially on Blencathras Southern face, deep gills continue the shaping . Blencathra would be much smoother without the ice, with very few crags and no stony slaty summit.
When you climb Blencathra imagine the ancient ocean 500 million years ago and then over 11,000 yrs ago ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing & finally the ice melting away to show what seens today.
Model is shaped down to 1100ft on South side and model base represents 800ft asl. Scale 1:18750 with slight vertical exaggeration.





SCAFELL PIKE & SCAFELL with-

Scafell Crag, Broad Crag, Ill Crag, Lingmell & Great End

Scafell Pike at 3210 ft/978m is highest mountain in Cumbria, England and Scafell at 3162ft/964m is 2nd highest. This area of the Lakes is made up of various volcanic rocks that are from 450 million years old but the oldest in the Lakes are 460 million years old. The volcanoes from 450 million years ago were explosive and erupted much ash, pumice, ‘bombs’ of lava and lava that flowed slowly as it was sticky. These Volcanoes were like those seen today on the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, also several in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Central France and some in Iceland. These are known as Stratovolcanoes and are generally a cone shape. Volcanic pyroclastics- ash, pumice & lava bombs were mixed with sediment that settled in lakes in a caldera or large crater. The volcanoes became extinct by the latest 440 million years ago. Over hundreds of millions of years they were worn down, sea levels rose, sediment covered the volcanic rocks, the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, the rocks were folded, uplifted and then eroded revealing the older hard volcanic rocks. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. Now the becks and ghylls continue to shape Lakelands Fells & Dales. The large climbing crags show these different volcanic rocks-lavas, volcanic pyroclastic rocks and a mix of pyroclastic rocks with hard sedimentary sandstone known as volcaniclastic rocks. These rocks are tough but the fells would be much less rugged without the ice, with fewer crags and no rocky bouldery summits. Next time you are out on the Fells imagine how big the volcanoes were with their powerful explosive eruptions, then ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing and finally the ice melting away to reveal what you see today. 
Model is detailed down to 1300 ft. Model base at 1000 ft. Scale 1:18750 with slight vertical exaggeration.

HELVELLYN with-

  Striding Edge, Swirral Edge, Catstycam, Nethermost Pike & Whiteside

Helvellyn ornamental model shows upper half of the Fell with its famous edges or aretes Striding Edge, Swirral Edge to Catstycam. Nethermost Pike and Whiteside are at either end. Helvellyn is 950 m/3118 ft asl and is 3rd highest peak in Cumbria. It is made up of various volcanic rocks that are from 450 million years old but the oldest in the Lakes are 460 million years old. The volcanoes from 450 million years ago were explosive and erupted much ash, pumice, ‘bombs’ of lava and lava that flowed slowly as it was sticky. These Volcanoes were like those found on the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, also several in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Central France and some in Iceland. These are known as Stratovolcanoes and are generally a cone shape. Volcanic pyroclastics- ash, pumice & lava bombs were mixed with sediment that settled in lakes in a caldera or large crater. The volcanoes became extinct by latest 440 million years ago. Over hundreds of millions of years they were worn down, sea levels rose, sediment covered the volcanic rocks, the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, the rocks were folded, uplifted and then eroded revealing the older hard volcanic rocks. Helvellyn and the Eastern half of the Lakes is less rugged than Western half and is made up of hardened volcanic ash mixed with hard sedimentary sandstone, this mix known as volcaniclastic rocks. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. Glaciers carved out the amazing aretes-Striding Edge and Swirral edge and where Red Tarn is known as a comb or corrie. The peak Catstycam is known as a pyramidal peak as glaciers carved it on all sides. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. The becks and ghylls continue to shape Lakelands Fells & Dales. The crags show these different volcanic rocks. These rocks are tough but the fells would be much smoother without the ice, with fewer crags and no rocky or stony summits. Next time you are out on the Fells imagine how big the volcanoes were with their powerful explosive eruptions, then ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing and finally the ice melting away to reveal what you see today.
Scale 1:18750 with slight vertical exaggeration. Model is shaped from 1700ft. Base of model represents 450 metres /1500ft asl.

SKIDDAW with-

Skiddaw Little Man, Lonscale Fell, Carlside, Longside, Ullock Pike & Bakestall

Skiddaw is made up of Metamorphic rocks that are now mainly slates, they were originally made from sands and muds that are 500 million years old and are oldest in the Lakes. They were laid down on an ocean floor but also shallow seas over millions of years. Over tens of millions of years the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, were uplifted then Volcanoes above sea level erupted lavas and ash completely burying these sedimentary rocks.  Magma then cooled deep under surface forming Granite which part baked the Slates known as contact metamorphism. This Skiddaw Granite can be found lower down at 1500 ft by the Caldew beck. Over the next hundreds of millions of years all these rocks were folded, compressed into Metamorphic rocks excepting the Granite, then uplifted, eroded, then sea levels reburied them, then more uplift and erosion. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. Now the becks and ghylls continue to shape it. Skiddaw would be much smoother without the ice, with very few crags and no stony slaty summit. When/if you climb Skiddaw imagine the ancient ocean 500 million years ago and then over 11,000 yrs ago ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing and finally the ice melting away to reveal what you see today.
Model shaped from 600 ft and base represents sea level. Scale 1:37,500 with slight vertical exaggeration.

LANGDALE PIKES Includes-

Pavey Ark, Harrison Stickle, Thorn Crag, Loft Crag, Pike O Stickle,

Rossett Pike, Bowfell, Crinkle Crags & Pike O Blisco.

This area of the Lakes is made up of various volcanic rocks that are from 450 million years old but the oldest in the Lakes are 460 million years old. The volcanoes from 450 million years ago were explosive and erupted much ash, pumice, ‘bombs’ of lava and lava that flowed slowly as it was sticky. These Volcanoes were like those seen today on the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, also several in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Central France and some in Iceland. These are known as Stratovolcanoes and are generally a cone shape. Volcanic pyroclastics- ash, pumice & lava bombs were mixed with sediment that settled in lakes in a caldera or large crater. The volcanoes became extinct by the latest 440 million years ago. Over hundreds of millions of years they were worn down, sea levels rose, sediment covered the volcanic rocks, the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, the rocks were folded, uplifted and then eroded revealing the older hard volcanic rocks. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. Now the becks and ghylls continue to shape Lakelands Fells & Dales. The large climbing crags show these different volcanic rocks-lavas, volcanic pyroclastic rocks and a mix of pyroclastic rocks with hard sedimentary sandstone known as volcaniclastic rocks. These rocks are tough but the fells would be much less rugged without the ice, with fewer crags and no rocky bouldery summits. Next time you are out on the Fells imagine how big the volcanoes were with their powerful explosive eruptions, then ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing and finally the ice melting away to reveal what you see today.

Model shaped from 400ft and base represents sea level. Scale 1:37,500 with slight vertical exaggeration

SCAFELL PIKE and Surrounding Fells. Includes-

Scafell, Broad Crag, Ill Crag, Lingmell, Great End, Great Gable, Glaramara, Esk Pike, Bowfell and Crinkle Crags.

‘Lakelands Volcanic Heart’ ornamental model shows the Lakeland Fells in Heart of the Lakes- Scafell, Scafell Pike to Great End, Great Gable, Glaramara, Esk Pike, Bowfell and Crinkle Crags. Also shown are the heads of Borrowdale, Langdale, Wasdale and Upper Eskdale. This area of the Lakes is made up of various volcanic rocks that are from 450 million years old but the oldest in the Lakes are 460 million years old. The volcanoes from 450 million years ago were explosive and erupted much ash, pumice, ‘bombs’ of lava and lava that flowed slowly as it was sticky. These Volcanoes were like those seen today on the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, also several in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Central France and some in Iceland. These are known as Stratovolcanoes and are generally a cone shape. Volcanic pyroclastics- ash, pumice & lava bombs were mixed with sediment that settled in lakes in a caldera or large crater. The volcanoes became extinct by the latest 440 million years ago. Over hundreds of millions of years they were worn down, sea levels rose, sediment covered the volcanic rocks, the sediment hardened into sedimentary rock, the rocks were folded, uplifted and then eroded revealing the older hard volcanic rocks. During the ice age the land was buried under ice, carved by glaciers and shattered by frost. The last glaciers melted away 11,000 years ago. Now the becks and ghylls continue to shape Lakelands Fells & Dales. The large climbing crags show these different volcanic rocks-lavas, volcanic pyroclastic rocks and a mix of pyroclastic rocks with hard sedimentary sandstone known as volcaniclastic rocks. These rocks are tough but the fells would be much less rugged without the ice, with fewer crags and no rocky bouldery summits. Next time you are out on the Fells imagine how big the volcanoes were with their powerful explosive eruptions, then ice covering the fells with glaciers flowing and finally the ice melting away to reveal what you see today.
Model shaped from 500ft and base represents sea level. Scale 1:37,500 with slight vertical exaggeration.

BEN NEVIS. Includes-

North Face- Carn Dearg Buttress, Tower Ridge, Observatory Ridge, N E Buttress, Carn Mor Dearg Arete, South Face of the Ben, Five Finger Gully and Tourist Route Up.


Ben Nevis at 4406 ft/1344 mtrs is Scotlands and all of Britain & Irelands Highest Mountain.
Much of Ben Nevis is made of Lavas from an ancient volcano that last erupted 390 million years ago. The volcano would have completely dominated the area, been a tall steep cone shaped stratovolcano. After volcano became extinct, magma rose up but cooled several miles below surface to form Granite. The lavas are called Andesites and can be easily seen on the great crags of the North face. Part encircling to North of Ben Nevis, is the Granite, the reddish colour easily seen on opposite peak of Carn Mor Dearg. Much erosion, sea burial and then uplifting of all the land that is now the Highlands part of Scotland followed and starting 2 million years ago ice sheets for a time completely covered what is now Ben Nevis. Around 18,000 years ago, the last ice sheets began retreating. 11-12,000 yrs ago glaciers carved out the great North Face, the narrow arete of Carn Mor Dearg and also the West corrie that has five finger gully and the large South face corrie. The summit plateau is bouldery and was formed by frost shatter, still happening today. Snow, Winter ice and high rainfall continues to shape Ben Nevis and snow falls most days of the year on the summit. Snow patches last well into Summer in sheltered gullies on the North Face and the snow used to last through the year and in many years as semi permanent snow fields. Recently lasting snow patches are getting rare due to rising Global temperatures.
The tourist route from the half way Lochan Suidhe (not on model) zig zags up the right (Southern) side of the stony & bouldery West face.
Ben Nevis's North Face is 'alpine' in scale and character and includes the longest rock climb in British Isles, Tower Ridge & one of the hardest rock climbs in the World, just recently successfully climbed.
The model represents the main part of Ben Nevis and shows detail from 2100ft asl. The base represents 1800ft asl. Scale at 1:18750.